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, but it seemed to me whenever nixon said, kennedy just looked at him and smirked. which played into kennedy's hands. he did have the indian side on that nixon. nixon gave him a poor family. he was clumsy. and he was defending an administration that he is not only in support of. >> what is the first thing you want to see as the debate began? >> that is an interesting question. i think maybe what i want to see is nothing. and maybe for the first time i will turn the tv on, walk into the other room and listen. and see what can be cleaned by focusing on what is being said, -- what can be gleaned by focusing on what is being said. >> we can stand by them. but that goes to the radio point of people who are listening to nixon on radio. >> i am listening for things that are said by the candidates, and especially things that i can then go back and verify after. to listen for claims, for arguments that i can go back and say, is this something that is real, that is credible? and then look out for other information that either verifies or --. >> i want to make a comment on the appearance of thing. that
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
democrat jay nixon is seeking his second term running against dave spencer also libertarian jim higgs and it's raised as lean democratic. september 21st this comes to us from kmiz-tv. it's about an hour. >> governor nixon. go ahead. >> it's a pleasure to see so many friends we have worked with for so many years one of the reasons i ran for the governor and the things i've done for the last four and a half years now, a lot of that goes back to the small town in missouri. i had an opportunity to see my mother and father actively involved in public service on the school board. my dad as the mayor and in the evenings when the phone would ring someone would call it a problem. i would often be the one that would head back to the kitchen table and plead the case of that person. what i saw with my mom and dad was a focus on making sure they help solve those problems in a positive way. they didn't ask whether the question can democrat or republican or from someone who supported him or not. they said what can we do to move our city, our area for word, and that is what i have done as your govern
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
this is exactly what richard nixon said in his debate with jack kennedy. i share jack kennedy's mission. i share his concerns. we have the same goals. people at home are cringing, why am i giving him money, why am i voting for a guy who has the same goals as another guy. cynthia, you will probably not remember the nixon/kennedy debates, but you don't say the other guy is a good, compassionate guy and he cares about people. i do, too! that's what he's saying. i'm just like him. if you believe he's compassionate, i am too! he's selling obama. >> you say that if you don't have anything else to say, chris. another thing the bloomberg poll shows is that voters -- more voters believe that barack obama has a concrete plan for helping the middle class than believe that mitt romney has such a plan. that's another problem mitt romney has. he had expected that the economy would win the election for him. all he would have to do is go to people and say, i'm not barack obama. i can do a better job. in fact, he needed to do a lot more. obama has laid out specific proposals. he's had a job for months now, but m
5010 jobs in 48 uneconomic development. jane nixon is not within the same world. we are in the world with hurt and despair. you see people putting $5 of gas in their tank because that's all they have. people wake up tomorrow hoping it's no worse than today and is going to the good life. it's okay for him. he's been on the payroll for 26 years. he is penchant for the rest of the site that we're going to pay. i'm sorry, the real world is about results and the results is where we find ourselves. in the real world, the ceo would be fired. >> was moved her next question then. this comes from miller and goes first first two days spent. >> colombia and other communities struggling to close the achievement gap among school children of different races. statewide data shows clear racial disparities in many socioeconomic indicators such as employment, education, homeownership and business ownership. what do you make of that? and as governor, what would you do to address it? >> i think it's all about jobs. we need more people getting taxpayers a number of people living off the government. you kn
power on a certain level. i mean, look, nixon, reagan, george w. bush, republican presidents have learned how to get stuff done at times in the face of congress and sometimes controlled by the other party. you know, this whole notion of the imperial presidency that arose under nixon, not coincidentally, a republican, i think you said it was kind of a tori sense built. but it's really a concentration of power. >> are they stronger than the democrats and they know what that is? assembly, parliamentary? >> in some ways they have been more skillful and more ruthless in the way that they have moved the levers of power. in washington and outside of washington, to get stuff done. >> joy, i don't think the republicans have a karl rove a. malignant sense of power, i'm going to be the architect and i'm going to rule and they are spreading the money around and trying to get back the power. it does seem almost obsessive, the love of the white house. >> i think eugene robinson is right. for conservatives, the idea of being the cowboy, they like the self-image for themselves and want that image
at 7:30 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span3. >> incumbent democrat jay nixon, a one-hour debate, the political report coming up. >> governor nixon, the head. >> the morning cometh a pleasure to be here and it's good to see so many friends that we have worked with for so many years. when i think back to the reasons that i ran for governor and the things that i have done for almost four years now, a lot of this is going back to small-town missouri. other i had an opportunity to see my mother and father actively involved in public service. my dad was mayor. in the evenings when the phone would ring, and he would call and i would often be the one that would head back to the kitchen table. and also plead the case of that person. whenever talk to my mom and dad, it was a focus on making sure that they help solve the problems in a positive way. they didn't ask where the question came from committee can ask whether it came from somebody who supported them or not. they said what can we do to move our area forward. that is what i have done. i focus on what matters, bringing people togethe
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
, if this issue really gets traction that it deserves, and let it say it deserves, go back. richard nixon was forced out of office because he lied. and because he covered some stuff up. i will be blunt and tell you this. nobody died in watergate. we have people who are dead because of this. there are questions to be answered and americans ought to demand to get answers. and it doesn't matter what the policies are. bill: you're 30 days out from here, under 40 days. how does libya factor in the national discussion? >> the bigger issue is not just what happened in libya. that is huge. the fact that an ambassador was assassinated is huge. the bigger issue, why didn't this white house, why did not this administration all of its various surrogates tell us the truth? they knew the truth. they just didn't tell it. and they have covered it up. in the same way they didn't tell us the truth about the fort hood shooter and didn't tell us the truth about the shooter in little rock who killed a soldier standing outside of a recruiting station. there is much to be held, they should be held accountable f
of the heroism of the bystanders in portland, maine. urs la nixon broke her leg after she crashed her car into the harbor. several people you see in the pictures there they jumped into the water as the car slowly sank below the surface. nix nixon's family says she faces weeks of recovery but she's grateful to her rescuers. looked like about five people or so there, wolf, jumped in that water. i'm sure that water wasn't very warm either talking portland, maine. >> they saved her. good for them, good for her. >>> gloria borger sat down with ann romney. but first, our unsolicited advice panel is standing by. they're going to preview some key questions you're going to want to listen for in tonight's debate. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
is not where people want it to be. >> we have a great candidate in missouri named jay nixon. he will be re-elected because he focuses on jobs. >> you are already holding that seat, though. it's the ones you might lose that are worrisome. >> akin is going to lose because of a demonstrated anti-woman policy that they have in the republican party where one month a senator says he will not endorse akin, and then the next month he says he will endorse him. >> what i said was that the national issues are big enough that we need to have a discussion of those issues rather than ones that todd managed to bring to the table. >> which hopefully will be more favorable than the ones that he brought up. >> it's about the majority and let's see how todd does. >> senator blunt, governor o'malley, thank you. >>> governor romney steps up his attack on president obama's economy. is romney on the right path to get back in the race? ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to s
. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise statement >> we believe peace is at hand. >> the first so-called october surprise, late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, they needed to end the vietnam war. this was sort of the definitive statement. >> the most famous october surprise was in 1980 and the surprise was what did not happen. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election in spite of president carter's efforts. instead, they were freed as soon as ronald reagan was inaugurated, delayed freeing the hostages. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in the sense that jimmy carter was a stumbling, ineffective president. >> reporter: fast forward to 1992. president george h.w. bush was already on the ropes against bill clinton over a sluggish economy. when casper weinberger was implicated in the iran-con
i explored it i assumed that kennedy had beaten nixon decisively but it only moved the poll as couple of spots but it allowed kennedy to prove that he could be president, to pass the threshold. acceptability in stature. same thing with jimmy carter. carter would not have been president without debates and kennedy said he wouldn't have been. sometimes it works at wary. generally, and, reagan, one debate, it was decisive, with one debate in 1980 and the last week of the campaign, because it allowed reagan to prove he wasn't dangerous. for romney the debate is all about being able to prove if my opinion several things, but most importantly, that he is not a bad person. he has 90 minutes, the obama campaign has spent several million defining him in a way that he murders people, that he is grossly for the rich. >> what does romney have to do? >> he needs to articulate a plan as to what he will do to change america. pat is right, he has to make himself accessible to the american people. beyond that, unless people get a sense that he has a clear at stiff vision for the country and
. >> a history of modern presidential debates. the first one was in 1960, kennedy-nixon. then there was a hiatus until 1976, when gerald ford agreed to debate jimmy carter. the debate commission was established in 1987. jim lehrer, tonight's moderator, has moderated the most debates over those years, 12 altogether. you have gotten criticisms about a moderator 6 -- selection, that they are mainstream media, all white, and middle-age or older. what is the response to that? >> we would state it slightly differently. we would say we have picked four exceptional journalists to have a lot of experience in doing presidential debates and covering politics in the white house and in foreign policy. we think they are also four individuals who have proven it is not about them. we do not want moderator's here trying to put themselves ahead of what the candidates have to say. at the end of the day, the american people want to hear from the candidates. one thing jim lehrer has demonstrated is that he is the type of moderator who lets the candidates do the talking. he will ask the questions, they will be pointe
with nixon it was about how he sweated. with george bush it was about looking at his watch. it's about someone's eye contact with the camera. but what this really still has to come down to is reminding voters what we're facing. and if we continue to import oil, and fund opec and send our soldiers to defend opec oil fields and lose our blood and treasure there, that's a concern. if we talk about the problems with china and the manipulating their currency and that affecting our manufacturing, that's a concern. it's about the cost of health care rising, about government's role in health care, those are concerns. and whoever looks nice in these things or talks nice doesn't matter so much as what the substance and the takeaway is. because the next morning people are still going to be concerned around their kitchen table, what affects american families. are their kids going to have a future? do they have jobs? is their economy growing -- >> i get that. but also, as you know, the whole point of televised debate, there is a measure of how did you look? how did you seem? did you seem presidenti
that first televised debate when americans saw kennedy and nixon on t.v. the second was the year 2000 when george bush overtook vice president al gore. as john mentioned earlier in the show that does not mean it is time to get complacent. one thing romney could have going for him is that the jobs report is out just 36 hours after the first debate. more john fugelsang coming up on the full court press and we're always live in chat, join us there, current.com/billpress. you're about to watch an ad message created by a current tv viewer for capella university. matter. i've been a nurse since 1979. i love being a nurse. a few years ago a friend i went to grade school with showed me a book she had kept from third grade. i had written that i wanted to be a nurse. after being a nurse for about twenty years i decided that i need to further my education. my masters degree was done completely online and that gave me the freedom and ability to do my education while i raised my kids and worked full time. raising my kids as a single mom and having them see me get my education online and work opportunit
. in the 1960s, 1960 election when richard nixon came out looking very haggard against the sharp and attractive john f. kennedy, and in 2000 when gore was condescending toward george w. bush. the point is, more than zingers, what seems to affect the outcome is your general likability. how you come across. last point, carol, i saw newt gingrich give advice to mitt romney. he said that these debates. his expert told him it's 85% visual, how you look, 10% how you say something, your tone, and 5%, only 5% what you actually say. that would certainly reinforce this likability prism. >> well, that 5%'s kind of depressing. >> it is. >> well, let me ask you this about likability. remember in 2008, obama had a problem with likability and he's turned that around. he's now the more likable candidate. there is a danger to him to appear unlikable in this debate if he gets too snippy or too condescending or too professorial. >> absolutely because he's coming from a position of authority or power. everyone expects him to win this debate, everyone, apparently except for governor chris christie. so he will have
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)